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Archive for the Category
‘Random Thoughts’

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Secret to a Successful Relationship!

Monday, September 8th, 2014

In 1964, Roddenberry proposed the original Star Trek TV series to Desilu Studios as “like Wagon Train, a Wagon Train to the stars.” The network rejected the show’s first pilot, “The Cage”, starring Jeffrey Hunter as Enterprise Captain Christopher Pike; however, NBC executives, still impressed with the concept, made the unusual decision to commission a second pilot: “Where No Man Has Gone Before”. The first regular episode (“The Man Trap”) of Star Trek aired on Thursday, September 8, 1966.

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Star Trek: The Original Series (Remastered), Season 1

Track Count: 29
Series: Star Trek: The Original Series (Remastered)
Genre: Sci-Fi & Fantasy
Released: September 8, 1966
© 2006 CBS Corp.
In the first chapter of the series that started a cultural phenomenon, Kirk, Spock, and McCoy project humanity into the 23rd century with compassion, boldness, and a curiosity to meet the unknown. For more than 40 years, viewers hungry for optimism have found inspiration from Gene Roddenberry's visionary allegory, hooked on the thought-provoking moral tales, the humor, the romance, the philosophy, and the inspired gadgetry aboard the first U.S.S. Enterprise. Now these remastered adventures look and sound even better than ever, with dozens of new and higher-detailed visual effects that blend seamlessly into the episodes you fondly remember.


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Too Hot Labor Day!

Monday, September 1st, 2014

Too Hot

Not again for 823 Years

Friday, August 1st, 2014

August 2014This month, August 2014, will have 5 Fridays, 5 Saturdays and 5 Sundays. This happens only once every 823 years.

The Pale Blue Dot

Tuesday, June 10th, 2014

PaleBlueDotFrom this distant vantage point, the Earth might not seem of any particular interest. But for us, it’s different. Consider again that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that in glory and triumph they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner. How frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity – in all this vastness – there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known, so far, to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment, the Earth is where we make our stand. It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.

—Carl Sagan

[The Pale Blue Dot is a photograph of planet Earth taken in 1990 by the Voyager 1 spaceprobe from a record distance of about 6 billion kilometers (3.7 billion miles, 40 AU) from Earth.]

How To Write Good

Friday, April 25th, 2014

1. Avoid Alliteration. Always.
2. Prepositions are not words to end sentences with.
3. Avoid cliches like the plague. They’re old hat.
4. Comparisons are as bad as cliches.
5. Be more or less specific.
6. Writes should never generalize.
Seven: Be consistent!
8. Don’t be redundant; don’t use more words than necessary; It’s highly superfluous.
9. Who needs rhetorical questions?
10. Exaggeration is a billion times worse than understatement.

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